Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Updated at 10:33 a.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden's nominee to head the Department of Homeland Security, Alejandro Mayorkas, is appearing before a Senate panel Tuesday to begin his confirmation process.

Mayorkas, who would be the first Latino and first immigrant to lead that Department, was previously the head of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a DHS agency, during the Obama administration. He then served as deputy secretary of DHS.

Watch the hearing live.

Updated 12:45 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden may not have big crowds at his coronavirus-limited inauguration, but he won't be lacking for star power.

The Presidential Inaugural Committee announced Thursday that pop star Lady Gaga will sing the National Anthem and Jennifer Lopez will perform a musical number at the Capitol ceremony next week.

For the second time in his presidency, the House is moving to impeach Donald Trump, who will become the first president in history to undergo such a rebuke.

Throughout Wednesday's debate, Democrats portrayed Trump as an ongoing threat to the country and democracy, while Republicans largely either defended the president or argued that the impeachment process would only cause further division.

Updated on Wednesday at 12:53 p.m. ET

Democrats in the House of Representatives are debating and voting on a single article of impeachment against President Trump, charging him with "incitement of insurrection" over last week's violence at the U.S. Capitol.

First lady Melania Trump condemned last week's storming of the U.S. Capitol in a statement Monday. She also criticized what she called "personal attacks" and "salacious gossip" about her and never alluded to her husband's role in inciting the mob.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

When President-elect Joe Biden is sworn into office on Jan. 20, a traditional element that once illustrated a peaceful transfer of power between presidential administrations will be missing: the outgoing president.

In a tweet Friday morning, President Trump said, "To all of those who have asked, I will not be going to the Inauguration on January 20th."

Updated at 3:54 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden delivered a blistering rebuke of President Trump on Thursday, a day after a pro-Trump mob breached the U.S. Capitol.

Biden called Wednesday "one of the darkest days" in U.S. history but said: "I wish we could say we couldn't see it coming. But that isn't true. We could see it coming."

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

After a mob of his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, President Trump downplayed the violence of the day and repeated his fraudulent claim that the election was stolen, but he also urged them to "go home."

In a Wednesday evening tweet, Trump wrote: "These are the things and events that happen when a sacred landslide election victory is so unceremoniously & viciously stripped away from great patriots who have been badly & unfairly treated for so long."

Updated at 2:22 p.m. ET

President Trump, in an extraordinary speech as Congress prepared to certify Democrat Joe Biden's victory on Election Day, called on Vice President Pence to reject Biden's win and send the results back to the states, something Pence who is presiding over the joint session, has no constitutional authority to do.

Pence then issued a statement, saying he had no authority to do what Trump was asking him to do.

The dramatic developments in Washington played out on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

Republicans seeking to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's win in the November election have moved to challenge the results from Arizona, as Congress begins the usually pro forma process of counting each state's electors.

The Arizona challenge is being led by Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who is seen as a likely presidential candidate in the 2024 election, and Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz.

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