https://macrostieartcenter.org/staff

Kayla Aubid is educator and arts administrator concentrating on contemporary Indigenous art, culture, and community agency.  She is a Blandin Foundation trustee, a commissioner on the Grand Rapids Arts and Culture Commission and the Gallery Director at MacRostie Art Center.  She’s joined us to  tell us about events for Indigenous Peoples' Day AND the Land Acknowledgement at the MacRostie Art Center. 

Bemidji Mayor Rita Albrecht joined us this morning to tell us more about the acknowledgment of Indigenous Peoples' Treaty Day in Bemidji.  We also featured Boozhoo Nana Boozhoo, Close to Home from the first Indigenous Peoples' Day in Grand Rapids as well a conversation with Kayla Aubid - Gallery Director at MacRostie Art Center in downtown Gr

https://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/ndeam/2012activities.htm

National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) is a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. The theme for 2019 is "The Right Talent, Right Now."

NDEAM's roots go back to 1945 when Congress enacted a law declaring the first week in October each year "National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week."

Each week John and Heidi pull up a chair to one of our member’s kitchen tables and get to know them a little bit better. This week’s caller, Chris, from Grand Rapids, invited us to join him in his very happy hour with his favorite adult beverage and hors d oeuvres followed by a nice plate of mom's spaghetti.

Hear the whole conversation by clicking below.

Our friends Nana Boozhoo and Natasha teach us the Ojibwe word we don't want to hear.  WII ZOOGIPON.  It will snow.

It's bound to happen.  It's northern Minnesota. 

You can meet the Ojibwe puppets and their creator this Wednesday October 16th at the MacRostie Art Center in Grand Rapids for their mid-month artist talk from 6-7pm.

Grant Frashier

Host Grant Frashier attends the first ever Iron Range Pasty Festival inn Mt. Iron.  

The culture was lost. Everybody had short hair.  Nobody was speaking in Ojibwe but, you know, the culture wasn't lost because people were still fishing and ricing and hunting and living within extended families. And so... all the meaningful native culture stuff you can't... destroy. - Michael Lyons referring to the time his grandfather fled boarding school and returned to Bena.

I really liked singing more than guitar but it was a great way to accompany myself.  It allowed me to sing... so that was really drew me to the guitar. 

We can't thank Michael Lyons and Boozhoo Nana Boozhoo enough for contributing this great content to KAXE/KBXE - Northern Community Radio.

Artistry, music, culture, language and some pretty freaking awesome puppets.  You hear it here on member supported KAXE/KBXE pledge your support now!

Debbie Center via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

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On a recent Sunday in a tiny gym just outside of Boston, physical trainer Justice Williams teaches Leo Morris a stretch called the Brettzel.

"Yasss," Williams shouts. "There you go. Elbows down."

"Jesus," Morris says, exhausted.

"Yass," Williams shouts again. "And hold. Very nice."

There's a lot to watch for in Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate in Ohio.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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