Phenology

Tuesday Mornings

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate.  John Latimer shares his phenology notes on what he has been observing this week.

John Guida via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

Each week, our resident Phenologist John Latimer compiles a report of the subtle and not so subtle phenological changes he's noticed in the past week. Pine needles falling, changes in the color of fireweed, a decrease in the number of wasps and hornets around hummingbird feeders, hummingbird numbers dwindling, blooming heart-leaved asters, Jerusalem artichokes and swamp milkweed are just a few topics John discusses in this week's report. 

Dallas Clell Hudson via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

Year-round, we hear from listeners who call or email their observations of the natural world to us and we love hearing from everyone who contributes!  During the school year, we have the sweet treat of hearing from classrooms and kids around the listening area as they report what they've been noticing.  This week, in addition to recieving emails and phone calls from listeners,  we heard from five schools and one homeschooler!  Acorns on the ground, a monarch release, ripe tomatoes, hawks, bears, geese, golf ball sized hail and bees are just a sampling of the reported observations that came our way in the past 7 days! 

Debbie Center via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Each week, our resident Phenologist John Latimer compiles his report of the subtle and not so subtle phenological changes he's noticed in the past week and he shares those observations with our listeners. This week, John discusses changes in daylight,  which trees are where in terms of their peak color, the bumper plum crop, rice worms, dragonflies, butterflies and more.   

Cis Pecharic Ramsdell via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

The school year is underway and that means our weekly phenology talkback segment just got exponentially more fun.  Year-round, we hear from listeners who call or email their observations of the natural world to us and we love hearing from everyone who contributes!  However, when school is underway we have the sweet treat of hearing from classrooms and kids around the listening area as they report what they've been noticing. 

https://www.conssci.umn.edu/people/students/ellen-candler

Are you a deer hunter, live with someone who is, or has a friend or relative who hunts deer?

The University of Minnesota researcher, Joe Bump and his graduate student, Ellen Candler are doing research to better understand what and when animals use deer gut piles provided by hunters across Minnesota.

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