pollinators

...we know that pollinators are really important to ecosystem health. They not only keep up the plants in our local community in lots of different ways by moving around to the flowers, but they also pollinate...when we go into grocery story, the produce section wouldn't be possible without pollinators... pollinators are the ones that make that happen. - Erika Bailey-Johnson

https://ncroc.cfans.umn.edu/

Once a year NCROC opens its doors to visitors to find out about all their research and work.  This year includes things like a Bog Boardwalk Tour, Wild Rice Paddies Tour, Cattle Research, Pollinator Studies, Community Gardens and a whole lot more.  It's free to the public and fun for all ages - including Farmer Ed's Petting Zoo.  Boreal Brewers will have free brew samples, Culver's will provide samples of custard and Duke Skorich BBQ will be selling food. 

http://fillmorenature.blogspot.com/2010/09/bumble-bee-on-stiff-goldenrod.html

This morning John Latimer asked DNR Bee Specialist Crystal Boyd "what is THE single easiest, most important thing that any of us could do to increase or help out our pollinators.  Crystal said "Plant local native wildflowers....if you provide it they will come!" 

She also told us about a great resource Bumble Bee Watch, where citizen scientists (that's you!) can post photos and get help with identification. 

Erika Bailey-Johnson was recently appointed to Governor Dayton's Committee on Pollinator Protection. In this interview, she explains what the committee will do, speaks to the status of pollinators in Minnesota, and reveals how she was appointed. Erika is Sustainability Director at Bemidji State University. Besides protecting pollinators she has worked toward sustainability with students for many years. Students are launching a "fossil fuel-free fish house" this year and are engaged in learning skills to live sustainably.