Phenology Report

Marilyn Lee via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

Every week we hear from Minnesota school kids and regular listeners as they call or email us with their nature observations. Bobcat tracks,downy woodpeckers, a snowdrift covering a classroom window (which a hero-custodian cleared away),  a close study of layers of snow and much more are included in these phenology reports!  

Marilyn Lee via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

Debbie Center via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

Every week we hear from Minnesota school kids as they call or email us with their nature observations. It may be frigid outside, but the kids noticed all kinds of activity this week.  Swans on the river, bald eagles, coyotes, a wolf in someone's yard, wild turkeys and information on where you can look to see Jupiter and Venus in the night and early morning sky are all inlcuded in these reports! 

John Guida via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Phenology is the biological nature of events as they relate to climate.  Every Tuesday morning, our resident Phenologist John Latimer gathers his phenological data and reports his findings in the weekly Phenology Report.  January is a fairly light month for outdoor animal activity.  Even though it's frigid, John reports that the chickadees are singing, pine siskins have taken over the Latimer bird feeder, and woodpecker pecked away on a deer carcus in his yard.   Those stories along with an update on various trees and a look through John's phenology notebook are all included in this segmen

Angela Nistler via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

Every week we hear from regular listeners and Minnesota school kids as they call or email us with their nature observations. This week, because of the Monday holiday, we only had two school reports.  We did hear from a number of other listeners, tho.  Topics in this week's talkbacks include invasive cattails, ravens, rabbits eating their own poop, the sound of the first "phoebe" song and a follow up on last week's discussion about sections of the Mississippi river becoming frozen.  

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