Phenology

Tuesday Mornings

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate.  John Latimer shares his phenology notes on what he has been observing this week.

John Latimer

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate. Phenology Talkbacks are an opportunity for us to hear what you are noticing outside.   Each week, our resident phenologist John Latimer gathers the talkback comments and closely assesses the subtle changes happening outside.  On Tuesdays during the Phenology Show, we hear all about it! 

Today we learn about many things including how heat from trees impacts the snow depth around them and an explanation for this picture of a hole in the bottom of a tree.  That and MUCH more in this week's report! 

Marilyn Lee via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate. Phenology Talkbacks are an opportunity for us to hear what you are noticing outside.  This week we heard from kids at North Shore Community School as well as a couple listeners in the Grand Rapids area! 

Doug reported some serious shrike action this week!

  Kids at North Shore Community School report longer days and much more!

  Pat from Grand Rapids had an otter question...

John and Heidi are joined on the Tuesday Morning Show by two University of Minnesota staff members.  Educator, artist, and scientist Abbie Anderson and phenologist Stephan Carlson talk about their project, Pesky Plant Trackers.

Jack North via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate.  Each week, our resident phenologist John Latimer closely assesses the subtle changes happening outside and gives a full, official phenology report.  This week, John reflects on his nature notes from decades past! He considers average coldest day of the, average date of robins returning, and he notes a change in the song of the chickadee! Listen to this week's report right here:

On the Tuesday Morning Show John and Heidi welcome back Pam Perry, a retired non-game wildlife biologist for the Minnesota DNR, who joins them to talk about birds.  Pam talks about the rare sighting of long-tailed ducks and tells us more about this Arctic duck while recalling a story of one that was included in the Pillager Christmas Count in 2007.

Katie Carter

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate. Phenology Talkbacks are an opportunity for us to hear what you are noticing outside.  This week, in addition to two phenomenal classroom reports, phenologist John Latimer heard from Northern Community Senior Correspondent Scott Hall and good friends Jack and Cindy Shelton. 

Scott saw seventeen trumpeter swans and dozens of golden eyes on the Mississippi. 

Birds: Brandon Lentz Finds a New Outdoor Passion During a Pandemic

Jan 26, 2021

KAXE/KBXE volunteer Brandon Lentz joins John Latimer and Heidi Holtan on the Tuesday Morning Show.  Brandon was recently appointed to the board of the Minneapolis Audubon Society and joins them to talk birds.  He tells us of his favorite places for birding in the Twin Cities area as well as many other areas throughout the state.  He lists some of the birds he has sighted in the metro area including varied thrush, winter finches, white winged crossbill, evening grosbeaks and the common redpoll.  He tells us about the red-tailed hawk spotted in his front yard and eastern screech owl by the Mi

Northern Waters Land Trust

This week we welcomed back the folks from Northern Waters Land Trust.  Our guests were John Sumption – Land Conservation Specialist and Annie Johnson Grants Manager/Conservation Specialist and board member Bob Karls. 

Katie Carter

Phenology is the rhythmic biological nature of events as they relate to climate. Phenology Talkbacks are an opportunity for us to hear what you are noticing outside.  This week, phenologist John Latimer heard from two classrooms who sent in stellar reports! 

Kids at Pike Lake Elementary report deer tracks, ice skating and an experiment to determine what nuts squirrels like best!  

 North Shore Community School kids report a pine marten, a flock of ducks and and they inspire John to discuss the uniqueness of the willow bud. 

UMD and NRRI Researcher Matt Aro on Thermally-Modified Wood

Jan 12, 2021
https://www.nrri.umn.edu/research-groups/materials-and-bioeconomy/market-oriented-wood-technology/thermally-modified-wood

The Star Tribune recently reported on new uses for dead ash, fir and tamarack trees.  Larch beetles, caterpillars and other invasive insects have killed more than 200,000 acres of balsam fir in Minnesota and half of the state’s tamarack trees.

The dead trees left behind don’t currently have a use – and could be a fire hazard. 

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