Gordon Coons

Every first Friday of the month, we check do our best to fill listeners in on what is happening arts-wise around the listening area in terms of first friday events and other arts related happenings. 

www.timberjay.com

This week on the Border News Roundup editor Marshall Helmberger fills us in on the condominium project in Tower, the gloomy and colder than usual temperatures this year, and peak color observations. 

Each week John and Heidi pull up a chair to one of our member’s kitchen tables and get to know them a little bit better. This week’s caller, Joe Morrissey from Ely, checked in from Mexico City where he was eventually going to think about breakfast of old tortillas, fried in coconut oil and topped with scrambled eggs and chilies, and accompanied by a cup of espresso.

Hear the whole conversation by clicking below.

patrickscully.org

To many, Walt Whitman is the quintessential American poet.  His messages of  democracy, individuality, inclusiveness and acceptance are arguably as relevant today as they were in the 1800s.  Minneapolis-based playwright, actor, dancer and Whitman aficionado Patrick Scully has created a theatrical production that brings the life and words of Whitman to the stage.  He's bringing his one man show to the Eagles Club in Bemidji October 4 in association with the Beltrami County Historical Society's fall fundraiser.  He spoke with us on the morning show about Whitman, the production and why he thinks Whitman fits the bill as one of America's greatest poets. 

The Beltrami County Historical Fundraiser starts at 6:30pm, October 4th at the Eagles Club in Bemidji.  The play begins at 7:00pm. 

Each week Scott and Heidi pull up a chair to one of our member’s kitchen tables and get to know them a little bit better. This week’s caller, Leah Corcoran from Aure, was working on her multi-stage breakfast of a delicious teacino (made from roasted dandelion roots), homemade grain-free granola, both with almond milk.

Hear the whole conversation by clicking below.

Each week John and Heidi pull up a chair to one of our member’s kitchen tables and get to know them a little bit better. This week’s callers Sarah and Josiah were hanging out in the deer stand but wouldn’t admit having cereal and yogurt for breakfast.

Hear the whole conversation by clicking below.

Jim Gallagher talks with author Martha Greene Phillips.  Martha compiled her father's journals and old black and white photos from over 100 years ago into the gorgeous book "Border Country: The Canoe Journals of Howard Greene 1906-1916"

Dallas Clell Hudson via KAXE-KBXE Season Watch FB Page

 

Every week, our resident Phenologist John Latimer gathers his phenological data and reports his findings in the Tuesday morning Phenology Report.  As always, we love to hear what our listeners are noticing out in nature.  Give us a call at 218.999.9876 and let us know what is happening around your place.  You can also send an email directly to John.  Either way, we want to hear from you!

Katie Carter

 

Every week we hear from Minnesota school kids as they call or email us with their nature observations. This week we were excited to receive our first report from Bemidji's new Gene Dillon Elementary school! We are over the moon with excitement about the number of classrooms engaged in our phenology program and very much look forward to next week's reports! 

http://www.co.aitkin.mn.us/departments/land/landhome.html

Mark Jacobs turned his love of the woods into a career in forestry, during which he applied innovative ways to look at and manage two hundred thousand acres of public forest lands in Aitkin County.  He is especially proud of his leadership in managing mixed hardwood forests.  Mark just retired after 39 years as a forester and land commissioner in Aitkin County.  In this conversation with John Latimer and Harry Hutchins, Mark talks about some of the innovative managemnt practices he adopted that are now widely used by private land owners and professional foresters.

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Letters recently sent from two female inmates at the Arizona State Prison Complex-Perryville describe their growing desperation as their basic hygienic supplies disappeared.

"I ran out on Saturday 9/30," one wrote, "and although I continually asked for [toilet paper], was told they were out. They did have pads that I used as [toilet paper] until Monday 10/1 when they ran out. I then had to use a wash rag until Wed morn."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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